RUTGERS EXPERIMENTAL MATHEMATICS SEMINAR

sponsored by the

Rutgers University
Department of Mathematics

and the

Center for Discrete Mathematics and Theoretical Computer Science (DIMACS)

Founded 2003 by Drew Sills and Doron Zeilberger.

Former co-organizers: Drew Sills (2003-2007), Moa ApaGodu (2005-2006), Lara Pudwell (2006-2008), Andrew Baxter (2008-2011), Brian Nakamura (2011-2013), Edinah Gnang (2011-2013), Matthew Russell (2013-2016), Nathan Fox (2016-2017)

Current co-organizers:
Doron Zeilberger (doronzeil {at} gmail [dot] com)
Bryan Ek (bryan [dot] t [dot] ek {at} math [dot] rutgers [dot] edu)

Archive of Previous Speakers and Talks You can find links to videos of some of these talks as well. Currently, our videos are being posted to our Vimeo page. Previously, we had videos posted on our YouTube page.


If you would like to be added to the weekly mailing list, email Bryan Ek (bryan.t.ek@math...).

Forthcoming Talks

Unless otherwise specified, seminars will be held in Hill 705 on the date indicated from 5:00 PM to 5:48 PM. Professor Zeilberger has promised to enforce the time limits.




Spring 2018

Date: January 25, 2018
Speaker: Adi Ben-Israel, Rutgers University
Title: Newton's Method: Universality and Geometry
Abstract:
          LaTeX Abstract is in PDF here.
The lecture has 3 sections:
(1) Given functions u,f:D → D ⊂ ℝ, if u(x)=1-f(x)/f'(x) for all x in D, we call f the inverse Newton transform of u, denoted f=N-1u. If 1/(x-u(x)) is integrable, then
(N-1u)(x)=C⋅exp{∫ dx/(x-u(x))}, C ≠0.

For such u, the iteration x+:=u(x) (away from its fixed points) is a Newton method on f, and the relations between (fixed points, monotonicity, of) u and (roots, convexity, of) f give a simple explanation of chaotic behavior, illustrated here for the logistic iteration (see citation in LaTeX document).
(2) A geometric interpretation of the complex Newton iteration, z+:=z-f(z)/f'(z), f analytic, (see citation in LaTeX document), allows extending the results of (1) to complex iterations. This is illustrated for the Mandelbrot set.
(3) An iterative method for minimizing a convex function f:ℝn→ℝ with an attained infimum, proceeds by bracketing the minimum value in nested, decreasing intervals. Each iteration consists of one Newton iteration, and the method has an advantage of fast convergence and a natural stopping criterion. This is illustrated for the Fermat--Weber location problem, (see citations in LaTeX document).


Date: February 1, 2018
Speaker: Gleb Pogudin, New York University
Title: TBD
Abstract:
          TBD


Date: February 8, 2018
Speaker: Manuel Kauers, Johannes Kepler Universitšt
Title: Symmetry Breaking in SAT and QBF
Abstract:
          In principle it is easy to find a solution of a boolean formula--just try out all possibilities. In practice however, the problem is not so simple, because the number of possibilities is so huge. Although it is hopeless to iterate over, say, 2^10000 possibilities, modern SAT can handle problems with 10000 or even more variables. They have a chance of success because they employ a carefully chosen combination of several techniques for cutting off irrelevant parts of the search tree. One such technique consists of exploiting the symmetries of the input formula. We will explain how this works and then present some recent joint work with Martina Seidl on an extension of these ideas to so-called quantified boolean formulas.


Date: February 15, 2018
Speaker: Jesse Geneson, Penn State University
Title: TBD
Abstract:
          TBD


Date: February 22, 2018
Speaker: Kelsey Horan, CUNY
Title: TBD
Abstract:
          TBD


Date: March 1, 2018
Speaker: TBD
Title: TBD
Abstract:
          TBD


Date: March 8, 2018
Speaker: Giora Dula, Netanya Academic College
Title: TBD
Abstract:
          TBD


Date: March 15, 2018
NO SEMINAR DUE TO RUTGERS' SPRING BREAK


Date: March 22, 2018
Speaker: TBD
Title: TBD
Abstract:
          TBD


Date: March 29, 2018
Speaker: TBD
Title: TBD
Abstract:
          TBD


Date: April 5, 2018
Speaker: TBD
Title: TBD
Abstract:
          TBD


Date: April 12, 2018
Speaker: TBD
Title: TBD
Abstract:
          TBD


Date: April 19, 2018
Speaker: TBD
Title: TBD
Abstract:
          TBD


Date: April 26, 2018
Speaker: TBD
Title: TBD
Abstract:
          TBD





This page is maintained by Bryan Ek. Send comments to bryan [dot] t [dot] ek {at} math [dot] rutgers [dot] edu.